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MODEL PORTRAIT - LIAM (ELMER OLSEN MODELS) BY EDWIN CABRERA

Here are the photos of male model Liam from ELMER OLSEN MODELS that I shot. MALE MODEL PORTRAIT MODEL: Liam  (ELMER OLSEN MODEL...

Friday, October 08, 2010

LACOSTE COLLECTORS' SERIES - LI XIAOFENG PORCELAIN POLO

LACOSTE Collector’s Series is a yearly project whereby the brand commissions a selected designer or artist outside the fashion world to reinterpret its iconic polo shirt.For its 2010 Holiday Collector’s Series, LACOSTE collaboratied with Chinese artist Li Xiaofeng to re-imagine the iconic LACOSTE L.12.12 polo shirt as an original work of art and then to create an exclusive print that will be used in a complementary limited edition of polos for men and women.
For its 2010 Holiday Collector’s Series, LACOSTE collaboratied with Chinese artist Li Xiaofeng to re-imagine the iconic LACOSTE L.12.12 polo shirt as an original work of art and then to create an exclusive print that will be used in a complementary limited edition of polos for men and women.

Li Xiaofeng created two different LACOSTE polos for the 2010 Holiday Collector’s Series. For the limited edition printed polo, he chose blue and white shards with lotus and children designs from the Kangxi Period (1662 - 1722 AD) of the Qing Dynasty (1644 - 1911 AD). The printed Porcelain Polo is limited to 20,000 pieces for both men and women and comes packaged in a silk pouch stamped with the red seal LI XIAOFENG LACOSTE logo above. The printed Porcelain Polo is limited to 20,000 pieces for both men and women, and comes packaged in a silk pouch stamped with the red seal Li Xiaofeng Lacoste logo. The Porcelain Polo will be available at all Lacoste boutiques across Canada.















Li who whose works are best described as a post-orietalism, explores a new concept and expression of Chinese landscapes. His choice of material is unexpected; instead of marble, wood or even glass, he prefers buying shards of broken porcelain recovered from ancient archeological digs, some dating from the Ming Dynasty, and then shaping and polishing them, drilling holes into each corner and linking them together with silver wire to create a form of clothing, including traditional Chinese dresses and jackets as well as neckties and military uniforms.




















1 comment:

Alice said...

Wow, I can't believe it. They are really fabulous and one of a kind. Are those Italian porcelain?